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LA Times: Vineyards may have kept wine country fire from getting worse

Vineyards may have kept Wine Country fire from getting worse

La Times | By Geoffrey Mohan | Oct 12, 2017 | Original Article

Christian Palmaz used hoes, shovels and rakes to keep flames from his family’s 19th-century vineyard estate home on the flanks of Mt. St. George in eastern Napa County.

But he didn’t have to worry about his vines. They’re green, very much alive, and a stark contrast to more than 500 acres of oak, manzanita and grassland charred by the Atlas fire as it tore across Palmaz’s property.

Wines & Vines: Out of the Ashes – Wine

Out of the Ashes – Wine

Wines & Vines | By Kate Lavin | Oct 10, 2017 | Original Article

San Rafael, Calif.—Members of the Palmaz Vineyards picking crew encountered an unwelcome guest as they arrived at the property early Monday. The Atlas Fire first reported Sunday at 9:20 p.m. was encroaching on the family-owned property in the Coombsville AVA. In a moment, the vineyard workers became firefighters.

Speaking with Wines & Vines today from the estate winery and vineyards where she lives with her family, Florencia Palmaz was still reeling from the events of the past 36 hours. But more than anything, she was proud.

Plumas News: Field Trip Applies Computer Science to Agriculture

Plumas News: Field Trip Applies Computer Science to Agriculture

Plumas News | By Maggie Wells | Sep 29, 2017 | Original Article

We don’t often think of agriculture and computer science in the same breath, but on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 10 computer science students from Indian Valley, Quincy and Chester saw first hand how the two go together.

Napa Valley vintner and Genesee Ranch owner Christian Palmaz hosted the Plumas County students at the Palmaz Vineyards in Napa Valley to observe the application of computer science in agriculture — specifically wine making.

2017 Harvest Tracker

2017 Harvest Tracker | By Christian Palmaz

As of SEP 30th, 2017

One you reach the half way point in harvest you begin loosening up the use of adjectives to describe your confidence in the vintage.  The beginning days of even the best harvest conditions still bring out cautious humility in even the most confident vintners.  However 15 days later, keep those still excellent harvest conditions and you start hearing reports around the valley that this is going to be a great vintage.   As thrilled as we are about the fruit that has come in thus far, there are still a lot of parcels out there developing — particularly our higher elevation fruit.

Marin Magazine: Visiting Palmaz Vineyards

Winespeak: Visiting Palmaz Vineyards

Marin Magazine | By Danielle Botros | Sep 29, 2017 | Original Article

Where Tradition and Technology Co-exist, Comfortably

As a fine wine specialist and someone who’s been in the business for over 20 years, I was both curious and a bit skeptical as to what this famously high tech winery was all about. Allow me to explain my cynicism. There tends to be a bias in the industry against what is perceived as “over produced,” or “showy” winemaking. As they say, “great wine is made in the vineyard,” not in a lab room. My goal was to see what the fuss was all about and if, indeed, the innovation made a difference in the wines.

SWANKY: Swanky Sips – Palmaz Vineyards

Swanky Sips – Palmaz Vineyards

SWANKY | Sep 22, 2017 | Original Article

From the first glimpse of the distinctive, handcrafted label, the wine lover begins to understand the Palmaz family ethos: “Love the land, know the grape and make a wine that honors both.”

To those familiar with the brand, a bottle of wine created by the Palmaz family evokes elegance, luxury, and the anticipation of pleasure on the palate.  This was the intention of Dr. Julio Palmaz and his wife Amalia when they founded the winery.  And so it remains today, as son Christian Gastón Palmaz and his sister Florencia continue the tradition started by their parents.

Digital Trends: The Winery of the Future Looks Like Something Bruce Wayne Would Run

The Winery of the Future Looks Like Something Bruce Wayne Would Run

Digital Trends | By Sam Slaughter | Sep 17, 2017 | Original Article

When winemakers a century from now look back on the technology that changed the game, one winery is going to stand out: Palmaz Vineyards in the Napa Valley. Though ordinary in appearance at first glance, an amazing array of custom-built technologies lurking in a subterranean lair bolster the winemaker’s craft with exacting science.

Luxury Life: Bringing Innovation & Invention to the Ancient Art of Making Wine

Bringing Innovation & Invention to the Ancient Art of Making Wine

Luxury Life | By Anita Scafa | Aug 19, 2017 | Original Article

To those familiar with the brand, a bottle of wine created by the Palmaz Family evokes elegance, luxury, and the anticipation of pleasure on the palate.  This was the ignition of Dr. Julio Palmaz and his wife Amalia when they founded the winery.  And so, it remains today, as son Christian Gastón Palmaz and his sister Florencia continue the tradition stated by their parents.  

CNET: Wine’s newest bouquet has hints of berries — and data

Wine’s newest bouquet has hints of berries — and data

CNET | By Erin Carson | July 18, 2017 | Original Article

You might not be able to detect notes of tech in your glass, but California winemakers are embracing cutting-edge techniques to create world-class vintages.

Palmaz Vineyards Reviewed by American Winery Guide

Palmaz Vineyards Reviewed

American Winery Guide | By Mark and Sonja Gudgel | June 15, 2017 | Original Article

The tectonic plates that slammed together to form Mount George and the other noteworthy peaks at the southern end of the Napa Valley had long since settled by the time that Henry Hagan arrived in California in 1852. Drawn north from San Francisco by the allure of untamed wilderness and unbridled natural beauty, the industrious Hagan founded Cedar Knoll Vineyard and Winery in 1881 and set about the business of viticulture with the spirit of a pioneer. Hagan experienced success with his wines, growing grapes in the unheard of Napa Valley and serving them mostly to locals in the Opera Houses and other upscale establishments of the Bay Area.