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Forbes: Alcohol and Balance

Wines Of The Week: Alcohol And Balance

Forbes | By Brian Freedman | Aug 24, 2018 | Original Article

Discussions of alcohol levels in wine are analogous to the third rail of train tracks: Often dangerous to even approach, and it should only be done with extreme caution. This is because everyone, it seems, has an opinion about what constitutes an “appropriate” amount of alcohol. It makes sense: The abv in a bottle has a huge impact on the balance of the wine, the flavor profile, the texture, the ways in which it interacts with food, and more. Strong opinions, on either side of the proverbial aisle, are justified, and I find plenty of merit in both.

But as with all deeply held convictions, it’s far too easy for logical argument to devolve into orthodoxy, when the reality is that there are plenty of great wines that don’t have all that much alcohol (the Kutch Bohan Vineyard Pinot Noir 2016, for example, clocks in at 11.3% abv, and it’s magnificent, with copious red fruit, Indian spice, and roses leaving a lasting impression long after the wine has been finished) and just as many that have higher levels (the Faust Limited Release “Graffiti Edition” Cabernet Sauvignon 2015, which comes in magnum and boasts 14.9% alcohol, is balanced and assertive all at once, with chocolate, cedar, blueberry cobbler, cassis, and cigar tobacco). They are verydifferent wines, but I find a ton of pleasure in both.

Palm Beach Illustrated: Chardonnay 2.0

Chardonnay 2.0

Palm Beach Illustrated | By Mark Spivak | Aug 22, 2018 | Original Article

American Chardonnay has gotten a bad rap—not without cause, in many cases. For a decade or more, beginning in the 1990s, it was impossible for them to be buttery enough, creamy enough or ripe enough. Sugar levels were staggering almost across the board. Returning from a trip to Germany in 1998, I was startled to find that many domestic Chardonnays were sweeter than the Rieslings I had been drinking in the Mosel and Rhine.

Big Data Beard: Palmaz Vineyards – Innovating Wine Through Data

Innovating Wine Through Data

Big Data Beard | By Erin K. Banks | LISTEN HERE

In this episode we met with Christian Palmaz, CEO of Palmaz Vineyards and President and CEO of Vactronix Scientific, a material science company based in Silicon Valley. Palmaz Vineyards has been able to pull together wine and data together to not make better wine but how can big data make the process less prone to error, more sustainable to quality and to allow the wine makers to focus on what is most important, making the best wine possible… to enhance the human element which makes wine beautiful, multi-dimensional, and complex. All the things we have a hard time putting numbers to

In the wine industry, there are many creative people, true artist but as Christian stated, “you can spend your whole life studying art but that does not mean you are going to be a great artist”. Christian now feels like he plays a supporting role to those that have the artistic direction even though he has a computer science background. His father started this innovative spirit and the process of using innovation to problem solve. Christian said it best when talking about his role in wine and data analytics, guys like him “don’t wield the paint brush, we make the paint”… and what great paint it is.

Recipes for National Wine and Cheese Day

Recipes for National Wine and CHEESE Day

By Florencia Palmaz | Pairing:  Palmaz Cabernet | At the Table and Around the Fire

What better way to pair Palmaz Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon than with four of our delectable cheese filled bites.

SMOKED DUCK AND FIG ROULADE

Palmaz Muscat and Chévre Cheesecake Cremes with Strawberry

Chèvre Cheesecake Cremes with Strawberries

By Florencia Palmaz | Pairing:  Florencia Muscat | At the Table and Around the Fire

This is a great base cream to top with any seasonal fresh fruit. In the summer, vanilla- scented strawberries are a favorite, and in the fall we will switch to candied citrus rounds. The cream lasts up to 4 days in the fridge and is perfect for a sweet treat when friends unexpectedly drop by.

Welcome to the Ranch Subscription

Welcome to the Ranch Subscription | By Florencia Palmaz | May 3, 2018

Many friends in both Napa and Genesee Valley have been asking what are the Palmazes going to do with all those fancy Wagyu cows on their ranch in Plumas County? At last I can share with you all what we’ve been cooking up, literally…

This last year I have learned more about ranching in the High Sierras than I ever thought possible. Thanks to Michele and the whole team at GVR, we have developed an animal welfare program that is producing incredibly luxurious Wagyu Beef in the most humane and environmentally responsible manner. Additionally, I learned how to butcher a whole animal from Plumas County legend Denny Wright and Wesley Neer. And finally, I honed my culinary skills on the task of how to prepare every cut of beef on an animal. 

Protecting our Most Precious Resource

Protecting our most Precious Resource | April 22, 2018 (Earth Day) | By Christian Palmaz

Driving into Palmaz Vineyards takes our visitors roughly a mile through the puzzle like lower vineyard parcels until they reach the winery carved into Mt. George.  Along the way, guests sometimes notice the small purple signs in the vineyards, “This area is irrigated with recycled water.”  Although during our tours, we normally make only mention of the winery’s net-zero water consumptive design, it often takes a backseat to the more wine facing innovations seen throughout the winery.  However on Earth Day, we’d like to take a moment and highlight how Palmaz Vineyards has gained this prestigious status of net-zero water consumption.  

The Palmaz Winery is situated inside the delicate and important MST (Milliken-Sarco-Tulucay) groundwater subarea.  Many years ago the MST was identified to be potentially in danger of overuse.  Increasing demand from homes, golf courses, and vineyard irrigation tap directly into this water source while drought weather patterns didn’t help with replenishment.  The Hagen Creek, which runs down from Mt. George through the Palmaz Estate, was identified as an important contributor to the MST during the development of the property.  

Rosemary Shortbread and Meyer Lemon Cookies

Rosemary Shortbread and Meyer Lemon Cookies

By Florencia Palmaz | Pairing:  Florencia Muscat | At the Table and Around the Fire

Rosemary grows in the planters around the winery. We are literally surrounded by the aroma of rosemary all year long. In mid-February, the rosemary blooms little purple flowers and the Meyer lemons ripen when there is little color in the garden. I couldn’t resist the temptation to bring these two lovely flavors together.

MAKES 40 TO 50

Wondering Between the Vines

Wondering Between the Vines

An Update on VIGOR By Christian Palmaz

One of the first memories I have in the Napa Valley was as a child, sitting in the backseat of my parents car as they drove up and down the Valley visiting wineries.  As my parents likely quibbled about some historical detail regarding the next winery we were visiting, I remember staring out the window mesmerized by the rows of vines zipping by.  Almost like a farmers kaleidoscope, the perfect rhythm of alternating row colors drew my attention not to the vines themselves but to the spaces in-between.  I wondered, what was so special about those “weeds” growing in-between the vines and why does every vineyard seem to be different.

Mandarin Sorbet with Candied Meyer  Lemons and Pistachio Chocolate Bark

Mandarin Sorbet with Candied Meyer Lemons and Pistachio Chocolate Bark

By Florencia Palmaz | Pairing:  Florencia Muscat | At the Table and Around the Fire

Few things grow in our garden during the winter months except lemons and mandarins. They are such welcome, fresh flavors during cooler weather, and this dessert perfectly cap- tures that freshness. To help this sorbet pair with the wine, I like to include a little of the Muscat I’ll serve that evening into the recipe. Do not, however, try to add a late-harvest ice wine to the sorbet or it will be difficult to freeze.